How to Lose Friends & Alienate People

How to Lose Friends & Alienate People

saw New York that way Toby Young sees New York in How to Lose Friends and Alienate People I absolutely could not live here. Luckily, I either live in a different New York, or interact with different types of New Yorkers, or I am not as much of a jerk as Toby Young. Most likely all three are true.One of the most fascinating things about How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is that the author has no idea how ironic his title is. For starters, one would expect a book with such a completely self deprecating name to be written by someone who has a modicum and humility and understanding of his privilege. But Young, a straight white guy in a man's world (whether he believes it or not) is so busy feeling sorry for himself for not being well-haired and handsome and, I guess, taller, all he can do is find fault with the people around him. And this is the real reason you feel alienated and don't want to be his friend. Not because the behavior he describes is really so bad, although it is, but that he doesn't even realize that it's straight white male privildge that keeps him from any meaningful consequences of his behavior.

Take, for example, the fact that he gets a job at Vanity Fair. At first I wrote “writing at Vanity Fair” and had to delete it. The man never seems to write anything for the magazine. All he seems to do is get drunk and be offensive and bitch about the women and the gay men at the office (his misogny taken to its logical conclusion I suppose) and get into fights with people who have less power than he does. But are there any real world consequences? Nope. For all of Young's complaining about the way Americans handle class, he doesn't seem to realize that his whole life is supported by the privilege he pretends not to have.